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This is bad. As I'm sure I am the last person on Earth to point out, folks in the New Orleans metro area had thought they survived the worst of Katrina, only to have pumps fail and flood waters rise beyond their worst fears. Then, of course, there are the areas to the east in Mississippi and Florida from which there aren't even many reports yet, because the devastation is so bad.

I am gratified to see how hard it is to load the Red Cross site, since it must mean that they are overwhelmed with folks who want to help. While their bandwidth is too taxed to handle your contribution, you might think about giving to Modest Needs.

Their general mission is to stop the cycle of poverty before it starts by helping out folks who are basically solvent, but suddenly find themselves in serious danger without a financial leg-up. They function as a stop-gap measure for the huge demographic who have real problems, but whom the government and most aid groups consider "not bad off enough."

In the case of the Katrina victims, they are trying to raise money to help people who, for example, might have just enough insurance to render them ineligible for help from other charitable organizations for things like food and clothing.

Then, when things slow down at the Red Cross, you could maybe give them a little, too.

Comments

fenriss
Aug. 31st, 2005 02:39 am (UTC)
It seems like it's always like that when the big disasters happen. When the tsunami happened, all I could do was throw my little pittance at it (a miserable drop in the bucket) and tell myself I might have alleviated a little suffering. But I suppose I didn't really.

Eventually, the people who got out in advance will have to go back and pick up the pieces. I want to do something, however small, to make that process easier.

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